Resources

Cowlitz County ACS

P.O. Box 703

Longview, WA  98632

USA

 

ACS/Cowlitz County EOC Call Sign:  N7DEM@CowlitzACS

President: Duaine (Butch) Lytle, AE7KJ, [email protected]


Vice-President: Rick Ouzts, WA7NWN, [email protected]


Secretary: Jeff Hillendahl, KJ6ETR, [email protected]


Treasurer: Ralph Roggenback, N2RJR, [email protected]


Trustee: Duaine (Butch) Lytle, AE7KJ, [email protected]

Resources and Links

Documents

page3image1031373760 page3image1031391600
page4image1052830864 page4image1052972752 page4image1052972960 page4image1052833216 page4image1052833520page4image1052914976 page4image1052915184 page4image1052915392 page4image1052915696 page4image1052916128
page5image1031152160page5image1031317728page5image1031179008 page5image1030914608 page5image1030885984 page5image1031392256 page5image1031330688 page5image1030872400 page5image1031181504 page5image1030883360 page5image1031384704page5image1031317392 page5image1031372368 page5image1031386384
page6image1054339232 page6image1054486368
page7image1054358944 page7image1054350864 page7image1054325632page7image1054508128
page8image1025929280 page8image1025552784 page8image1026300816page8image1026301024 page8image1025558784
page9image939211200 page9image1025562576page9image1026302512page9image939398784 page9image939289904page9image1026311728 page9image938707424page9image1025553264 page9image1026476240 page9image1025554128 page9image1025560736 page9image1026308320page9image939396064 page9image1025935968 page9image1025921344 page9image939303536page9image939382192 page9image939217776 page9image1026371648 page9image1025933632 page9image1026372064
page10image939300800

Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Interoperability Plan

Appendix A – Activation Checklist

This checklist is provided so that amateur radio emergency communications leaders may track milestones during an emergency/disaster activation of amateur radio resources. It is suggested that copies of this appendix be made and a separate copy used as the checklist for each activation.

A1 ActivationChecklist–ServedAgency √

A1.1 The served agency contacts the Duty Officer at the emergency management department in the local jurisdiction to request activation of amateur radio emergency communications personnel.

Although NIMS and ICS compliance mandates that no emergency responder or NGO volunteer may “self deploy” to an incident, nothing in this plan prohibits this message being communicated via amateur radio if requested by the served agency leader.

A2 ActivationChecklist–LocalEmergencyManagementDepartment √

  1. A2.1  If not already assigned for this incident, the emergency management department in the local jurisdiction obtains a mission number from the Washington Department of Emergency Management.

    Nothing in this plan prohibits this message being communicated via amateur radio if requested by the local Emergency Manager.

  2. A2.2  Emergency management personnel contact the local amateur radio emergency communications leader(s) using the contact list on file.

    In preparation for activations, the amateur radio contact list on file with the emergency management department in the local jurisdiction should be kept up­to­date as often as necessary.

A3 ActivationChecklist–LocalJurisdictionAmateurRadioLeaders √

  1. A3.1  Receive activation notice and mission number from the emergency management department in the local jurisdiction.

  2. A3.2  Discuss activation parameters with the emergency management department in the local jurisdiction.

  3. A3.3  Notify affected amateur radio emergency communications personnel and disseminate the mission number and activation parameters.

  4. A3.4  If it is probable that the incident may expand, initiate a general alert notification using the standard call­out procedure to advise all amateur radio emergency communications personnel what is happening.

page11image1755708688

Washington RHSCD IV Appendix A, page 1 of 3 31 March 2014

Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Interoperability Plan

  1. A3.5  Notify the ARES District Emergency Coordinator (DEC), the ARES Section Emergency Coordinator (SEC), and the ARRL Section Manager (SM) of the situation (as a matter of protocol for ARES organizations and as a courtesy in other local organizational structures).

  2. A3.6  Amateur radio emergency communications personnel deploy with any/all necessary communications equipment, 72 hour personal support kit, and documentation (copy of Amateur License, Emergency Worker Card, operating aids) to support the mission.

  3. A3.7  All locations with amateur radio emergency communications personnel begin a station log and a State of Washington Emergency Worker Daily Activity Report (Form EMD­078).

  4. A3.8  As needed, plan for multiple shifts and relief operators at each location.

  5. A3.9  If it is probable that the incident may expand, initiate a notification to amateur radio emergency communications leaders in adjacent Washington State Regional Homeland Security Coordination District IV jurisdictions.

  6. A3.10  If amateur radio emergency communications personnel from adjacent jurisdictions are needed to assist with incident communications, initiate a formal request for their services through the emergency management department in the local jurisdiction.

A4 ActivationChecklist–RegionalAmateurRadioLeaders √

  1. A4.1  Receive activation notice and mission number from the emergency management department in the local jurisdiction.

  2. A4.2  If not already known prior to the official activation, discuss activation parameters and logistics support with amateur radio emergency communications leaders in the affected jurisdiction(s).

  3. A4.3  If required, activate the Washington Region IV Emergency Operations Net and/or the radio rooms in the Emergency Operations Centers in some/all of the affected counties.

  4. A4.4  Provide communications support to the affected jurisdiction(s) as needed.

A5 DeactivationChecklist √

  1. A5.1  Confirm that all locations with amateur radio emergency communications personnel secure their station(s), close out the station log, and complete Form EMD­078.

  2. A5.2  Confirm that all activated amateur radio emergency communications personnel have safely reached their respective residences.

  3. A5.3  All station logs and completed Forms EMD­078 to the amateur radio emergency communications leader in the local jurisdiction.

page12image1755431440 page12image1755432352 page12image1755433648

Washington RHSCD IV Appendix A, page 2 of 3 31 March 2014

Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Interoperability Plan

  1. A5.4  The amateur radio emergency communications leader in each local jurisdiction forwards all completed Forms EMD­078 and other pertinent incident documentation to the emergency management department in the local jurisdiction.

  2. A5.5  All activated amateur radio emergency communications personnel complete an After Action Report (AAR) and send it to the amateur radio emergency communications leader in their local jurisdiction.

Washington RHSCD IV Appendix A, page 3 of 3 31 March 2014

Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Interoperability Plan

Appendix B – Regional Net Protocols

These protocols are designated for Washington RHSCD IV emergency/disaster communications interoperability via amateur radio.

B1 Concept of Operations

  1. B1.1  TheWashingtonRegionIVEmergencyOperationsNetisdesignedforinter­jurisdictionalcommand and control operations. It serves as a:

    • DirectinterconnectionbetweentheprimaryEOCineachWashingtonRHSCDIVcounty.

    • BackuptocommunicationsprovidedbytheWashingtonComprehensiveEmergency

      Management Network (CEMNET) in RHSCD IV counties.

    • CommonpointofexternalcontactwiththeregionbytheWashingtonEmergency Management Division (EMD) and by adjoining Regional Homeland Security Coordination Districts.

  2. B1.2  ParticipationintheRHSCDIVnetislimitedtostationsoperatingfromwithinastateorcountyEOC, stations authorized by a state or county EOC to communicate on their behalf, an (optional) Region IV net control station (NCS), and alternate Region IV net control stations. Although FCC regulations prohibit “frequency ownership” in the amateur bands, every effort will be used to enlist voluntary cooperation by other amateurs during simulated and emergency/disaster operations.

  3. B1.3  Thisnetisnotforcommunicationsbetween:

    • AnIncidentCommandPostandthejurisdictionalEOC.

    • Amateurradioemergencycommunicationsvolunteerswhoarenotaffiliatedwithdistrict operations .

      B2 Protocols – Net Activation

  1. B2.1  ActivationoftheWashingtonRHSCDIVnetmayoccurinoneofthefollowingways:

    • Asagreeduponinadvancebytheamateurradioemergencycommunicationsleadersinthe Washington RHSCD IV (for training and exercises).

    • AttherequestoftheEmergencyManageroramateurradioemergencycommunications leader in an affected area.

    • Self­activationbyaRegionIVNCSafteraDisasterEmergency(asdefinedinsection6.3) strikes, and when no amateur radio emergency communications leader can be contacted.

  2. B2.2  TheregionalnetshouldbeestablishedonAppendixCfrequenciesWW4A00(primary),WA4A01 (secondary), or WA4A21 (tertiary) unless conditions surrounding the emergency require otherwise.

  3. B2.3  Ifnetoperationscannotbeestablishedonanyofthesefrequencies,theEOCsshoulduseother forms of contact (such as available commercial services) to coordinate communications frequencies.

Washington RHSCD IV Appendix B, page 1 of 4 9 March 2016

Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Interoperability Plan

B2.4 IntheeventthatthemethodsinparagraphsB2.2andB2.3fail,thenEOCsshouldtransmit/listenon the Washington RHSCD IV frequencies listed in Appendix C at specific times past the hour as follows:

  • From :00 through :04

  • From :05 through :09

  • From :10 through :14

  • From :15 through :19

  • From :20 through :24

  • From :25 through :29

– WA4A02 – WA4A20 – WA4A22 – WA4A10 – WA4A23 – WA4A41

  • From :30 through :34

  • From :35 through :39

  • From :40 through :44

  • From :45 through :49

  • From :50 through :54

  • From :55 through :59

– WA4A02 – WA4A24 – WA4A22 – WA4A26 – WA4A23 – WA4A42

B2.5 NothinginthisprotocolpreventsamateurradioemergencycommunicationspersonnelatanEOC from delegating contact initiation to multiple other amateur radio emergency communications stations so that many frequencies can be monitored in parallel and the remote EOC contacted more quickly to establish a direct communications link.

B3 Protocols – Net Operations

  1. B3.1  EachEOC,ortheNCSifactivated,shallestablishcontactwithjurisdictionalandstateEOCs,and other entities specified in the Washington State Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan as required to facilitate communications. Maintaining redundant paths and modes of operation is deemed indispensable.

  2. B3.2  IfaNCSisactivated,theNCSwillmaintainaclearfrequencyforinter­jurisdictionalcommandand control communications and serve, as needed, as a “store and forward” communications entity for times when EOC personnel are otherwise occupied and are unable to immediately respond.

  3. B3.3  NCSoperatorsmaytransferallorpartoftheirNCSdutiestoalternateRegionIVNCSoperatorsto enhance net efficiency and/or for rest periods.

  4. B3.4  Thetacticalidentifiersused(andexpected)onthisnetare:

    “ {county} EOC” “NCS”and“AlternateNCS” “OES”




• “ {county} EOC Relay”

page15image1751969312 page15image1751969712

Washington RHSCD IV

Appendix B, page 2 of 4

9 March 2016

“WashingtonStateEMD”(or“CampMurray”)

Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Interoperability Plan

B4 Protocols – Weekly Operational Test

Each Tuesday at 9:15am (on each frequency to be tested):
• QST,QST,QST,theweeklyoperationaltestoftheWashingtonRegionIVEmergencyOperationsNetwill

be conducted on this frequency in approximately five minutes. End of QST. {callsign} Each Tuesday at 9:20am:

  • QST,QST,QST,thisis {callsign} in {name} County,Washington,conductingtheweekly operational test of the Washington Region IV Emergency Operations Net. During emergencies and disasters, this net may be activated to coordinate response activities between the Washington Region IV EmergencyOperationsCentersinClark,Cowlitz,Skamania,andWahkiakumcounties. Weaskthat amateur radio stations which are not affiliated with district operations please stand by during this test.

  • StationslocatedataRegionIVcountyEOCpleasecheckinnow.

  • StationslocatedatastateEOCoracountyEOCoutsideRegionIVpleasecheckinnow.

  • RegionIValternatenetcontrolstationspleasecheckinnow.

  • ARRLOfficialEmergencyStationspleasecheckinnow.

  • RegionIVEOCRelayStationspleasecheckinnow.

  • Doesanystationhaveanybusinesswithanotherstation?

  • Arethereanymissedcheck­ins?

  • Hearingnofurthercheck­ins,thisoperationaltestoftheWashingtonRegionIVEmergencyOperationsNet is closed. We would like to thank all stations for participating, the repeater owner for the use of the repeater, and all stations which stood by to give us a clear operating frequency.

page16image1050539104 page16image1050539408 page16image1050539712
  • [Optional] This net will now move to {band} .

  • Thisfrequencyisreturnedtonormalamateuruse.

{callsign}

page16image1050654016 page16image1050654320

Washington RHSCD IV Appendix B, page 3 of 4 9 March 2016

Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Interoperability Plan

B5 Protocols – Start of Emergency/Disaster Operations

  • QST,QST,QST,thisis {callsign} in {name} County,Washington,activatingthe Washington Region IV Emergency Operations Net to provide inter­jurisdictional command and control communications for the current {type} emergency/disaster affecting our region. Participation in this net is limited to stations operating within a state or county EOC, stations authorized by a state or county EOC to communicate on their behalf, and alternate Region IV net control stations. Other stations involved with emergency communications should contact the NCS within their county or local jurisdiction. Your voluntary cooperation in maintaining a clear frequency for emergency operations is very much appreciated.

  • StationslocatedataRegionIVcountyEOCpleasecheckinnow.

  • StationslocatedatastateEOCoracountyEOCoutsideRegionIVpleasecheckinnow.

  • RegionIValternatenetcontrolstationspleasecheckinnowandreportyouravailabilityforincident operations.

  • ARRLOfficialEmergencyStationspleasecheckinnowandreportyouravailabilityforincidentoperations.

  • RegionIVEOCRelayStationspleasecheckinnowandreportyouravailabilityforincidentoperations.

  • Thisnetisnowopenfortheexchangeofinter­jurisdictionalcommandandcontrolmessages,andEOCs may directly contact each other (or the NCS) at their discretion.

    B6 Protocols – Periodically During Operations

• Thisis {callsign} in {name} County,Washington,netcontrolfortheWashingtonRegion IV Emergency Operations Net. This net is activated to provide inter­jurisdictional command and control communications for the current {type} emergency/disaster affecting our region. Participation in this net is limited to stations operating within a state or county EOC, stations authorized by a state or county EOC to communicate on their behalf, and alternate Region IV net control stations. Other stations involved with emergency communications should contact the NCS within their county or local jurisdiction. Your voluntary cooperation in maintaining a clear frequency for emergency operations is very much appreciated. EOCs may directly contact each other or the NCS at their discretion.

B7 Protocols – End of Emergency Operations

  • Thisis {callsign} in {name} County,Washington,netcontrolfortheWashingtonRegion IV Emergency Operations Net. This net was activated to provide inter­jurisdictional command and control communications for the {type} emergency/disaster affecting our region. The Washington Region IV Emergency Operations Net is now closed. We would like to thank all stations for helping to maintain a clear frequency for emergency/disaster operations and the repeater owner for the use of the repeater.

  • Thisfrequencyisreturnedtonormalamateuruse. {callsign}
    Washington RHSCD IV Appendix B, page 4 of 4 9 March 2016

page17image1026929488 page17image1026929792 page17image1026930096 page17image1026930464 page17image1026930768 page17image1026931072 page17image1026931376 page17image1026931808 page17image1026932112 page17image1026932416
page18image1054612784

Amatuer Radio Emergency Communications Interoperability Plan

ICS Form 217A

COMMUNICATIONS RESOURCE AVAILABILITY WORKSHEET

Frequency Band

Amateur Radio
(US CFR, Title 47, Part 97)

Description

Regional & State Interoperability

Remarks

Appendix C – Emergency Frequencies and Modes

e
Channel
Receive
Transmit
ni
Channel Name
Eligible Users
L
Configuration
Frequency Tone / NAC
Frequency Tone / NAC

Emission Mode ITU

Intra-Region: Washington RHSCD IV [ARES District 4] (RACES OPS-1 network)

  1. 1  repeater

  2. 2  repeater

  3. 3  repeater

  4. 4  simplex

  5. 5  simplex

  6. 6  simplex

  7. 7  simplex

  8. 8  simplex

  9. 9  simplex

  10. 10  simplex

  11. 11  simplex

  12. 12  simplex

  13. 13  simplex

  14. 14  simplex

  15. 15  simplex

  16. 16  simplex

  17. 17  simplex

  18. 18  simplex

  19. 19  simplex

  20. 20  simplex

  21. 21  simplex

  22. 22  simplex

  23. 23  simplex

  24. 24  simplex

WW4A00 WW4A01 WW4A02 WW4A10 WW4A11 WW4A12 WW4A13 WW4A14 WW4A15 WW4A20 WW4A21 WW4A22 WW4A23 WW4A24 WW4A25 WW4A26 WW4A27 WW4A28 WW4A29 WW4A40 WW4A41 WW4A42 WW4A43 WW4A44

WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV

224.720 none 147.300 none 52.810 none 52.550 none 145.550 none 223.550 none 445.550 none 927.550 none 1294.550 none

1.955 n/a

3.855 n/a 5.3570 n/a 7.255 n/a 14.255 n/a 18.155 n/a 21.355 n/a 24.955 n/a 28.455 n/a 50.550 n/a

1.855 carrier 3.555 carrier 7.055 carrier

10.125 carrier 14.055 carrier

223.120 100.0 147.900 114.8 51.110 100.0

52.550 none 145.550 none 223.550 none 445.550 none 927.550 none

1294.550 none 1.955 n/a 3.855 n/a 5.3570 n/a 7.255 n/a 14.255 n/a 18.155 n/a 21.355 n/a 24.955 n/a 28.455 n/a 50.550 n/a

1.855 carrier 3.555 carrier 7.055 carrier

10.125 carrier 14.055 carrier

FM-W F3E
Larch Mtn. KB7APU FM-W F3E
Woodland, WA W7DG FM-W F3E
Nicolai Mtn. K7GA FM-W F3E

FM-W F3E FM-W F3E FM-W F3E FM-W F3E FM-W F3E

LSB J3E LSB J3E USB J3E LSB J3E USB J3E USB J3E USB J3E USB J3E USB J3E SSB J3E CW A1A CW A1A CW A1A CW A1A CW A1A

Washington RHSCD IV

Appendix C, page 1 of 4

Updated: 22 March 2016

page19image1751472992

Amatuer Radio Emergency Communications Interoperability Plan

ICS Form 217A

  1. 28  repeater

  2. 29  repeater

  3. 30  repeater

  4. 31  simplex

  5. 32  simplex

  6. 33  simplex

  7. 34  repeater

  8. 35  repeater

  9. 36  repeater

  10. 37  simplex

  11. 38  simplex

  12. 39  simplex

  13. 40  repeater

CLRK01 CLRK02 CLRK30 CLRK46 CLRK48

Clark Co.
Clark Co.
Clark Co.
Clark Co.
Clark Co. Cowlitz Co. Cowlitz Co. Cowlitz Co. Cowlitz Co. Skamania Co. Skamania Co. Wahkiakum Co. Wahkiakum Co.

147.240 none

443.925 none 440.0125 none 144.990 none 144.920 none 144.920 none 147.260 none 224.660 none 444.900 none

3.825 n/a

7.245 n/a 145.630 none 444.500 none

94.8 94.8 none none none none 114.8 114.8 114.8 n/a n/a none 118.8

n/a

n/a 100.0 136.5

FM-W F3E
Livingston Mtn. FM-W F3E
Livingston Mtn. FM-N F7W
DSTAR
FM-W F3E
BBS, 1200 baud FM-W F3E
RMS, 1200 baud FM-W F3E
RMS, 1200 baud FM-W F3E
Columbia Hgts. FM-W F3E
Rainier Hill FM-W F3E
Columbia Hgts. LSB J3E

W7AIA W7AIA K7CLL K7CLL-8 K7GJT-10 N7DEM-10 W7DG NU7 D W7DG KE7BUI KE7BUI K7GA-10 K7GA

W7SIX W7AAO

K7CPR N7XAC W7EOC

COMMUNICATIONS RESOURCE AVAILABILITY WORKSHEET

Frequency Band

Amateur Radio
(US CFR, Title 47, Part 97)

Description

Regional & State Interoperability

e Channel
Receive
Transmit
ni Channel Name
Eligible Users
L Configuration
Frequency
Tone / NAC
Frequency
Tone / NAC

Emission Mode ITU

CW A1A CW A1A CW A1A

Remarks

  1. 25  simplex

  2. 26  simplex

  3. 27  simplex

WW4A45 WW4A46 WW4A47

WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV

21.055
carrier 28.055
carrier 50.055
carrier

21.055
carrier 28.055
carrier 50.055
carrier

147.840

448.925 445.0125 144.990 144.920 144.920 147.860 223.060 449.900 3.825 7.245 145.630 449.500

Intra-County: Washington RHSCD IV [ARES District 4] (RACES OPS-2 network)

Intra-State: Washington Emergency Management Division [W7EMD] (RACES CMD-1 network)

LSB J3E FM-W F3E FM-W F3E

LSB J3E

USB J3E FM-W F3E FM-W F3E

RMS, 1200 baud Nicolai Mtn.

Grass Mtn. Grass Mtn.

  1. 41  simplex

  2. 42  simplex

  3. 43  repeater

  4. 44  repeater

WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV WA Region IV

3.985 5.3715 53.870

145.370

n/a 3.985

n/a 5.3715 none 52.170 none 145.970

Intra-State: adjacent Washington RHSCD III [ARES District 3] and Washington RHSCD VIII [ARES District 8]

  1. 45  repeater

  2. 46  repeater

  3. 47  repeater

WA Region III WA Region III WA Region III

145.470 none 144.870
100.0 FM-W F3E
Capitol Peak 224.040 none 222.440
118.8 FM-W F3E
KO Peak 444.950 none 449.950
118.8 FM-W F3E
Capitol Peak

Washington RHSCD IV

Appendix C, page 2 of 4

Updated: 22 March 2016

page20image1049656144

Amatuer Radio Emergency Communications Interoperability Plan

ICS Form 217A

e ni

Receive Frequency Tone / NAC

3.985 n/a 7.245 n/a 3.985 n/a

Channel Configuration

  1. 48  simplex

  2. 49  simplex

  3. 50  simplex

  4. 51  simplex

  5. 52  simplex

  6. 53  repeater

  7. 54  repeater

  8. 55  repeater

  9. 56  repeater

  10. 57  repeater

  11. 58  repeater

  12. 59  repeater

  13. 60  repeater

  14. 61  repeater

  15. 62  simplex

  16. 63  simplex

Channel Name

Eligible Users

WA Region
VIII WA Region
VIII Klickitat Co. Klickitat Co.

Klickitat Co. Lewis Co. Pacific Co. Pacific Co. Pacific Co. Pacific Co. Yakima Co. Yakima Co. Yakima Co. Yakima Co. Yakima Co. Yakima Co.

Remarks

L

  1. 64  simplex

  2. 65  simplex

  3. 66  repeater

  4. 67  repeater

68

  1. 69  repeater

  2. 70  repeater

  3. 71  repeater

  4. 72  repeater

  5. 73  repeater

OR Region II

OR Region II D1-1 OR Region II OR Region II

OR Region IV

  1. CLAC01  Clackamas Co.

  2. CLAC02  Clackamas Co.

CLAC04 Clackamas Co. CLAC07 Clackamas Co.

CLAT01 Clatsop Co.

3.985 n/a 3.985 7.245 n/a 7.245

COMMUNICATIONS RESOURCE AVAILABILITY WORKSHEET

Frequency Band

Amateur Radio
(US CFR, Title 47, Part 97)

Transmit
Emission Frequency
Tone / NAC Mode ITU

Description

Regional & State Interoperability

Washington RHSCD IV

Appendix C, page 3 of 4

Updated: 22 March 2016

PAC023 PAC061 PAC062

5.3715 n/a
5.3715 7.245 n/a
7.245 147.060 none
147.660 147.020 none
147.620 147.180 none
147.780 440.675 none
445.675 441.675 none
446.675 146.660 none
146.060 146.840 none
146.240 147.300 none
147.900 147.080 none
147.680 3.985 n/a 3.985 7.245 n/a 7.245

110.9 FM-W F3E
Boistfort Peak 118.8 FM-W F3E
KM Hill
82.5 FM-W F3E
Megler Mtn. 118.8 FM-W F3E
Naselle Ridge 118.8 FM-W F3E
KO Peak 123.0 FM-W F3E
Yakima Ridge 123.0 FM-W F3E
Elephant 123.0 FM-W F3E
Bethel Ridge 123.0 FM-W F3E
King Mtn.
n/a LSB J3E

N7PRJ NM7 R NM7 R NM7 R N7XAC W7AQ W7AQ W7AQ WA7SAR

K7RPT K7RPT

K7RPT W7AC W7OTV KD7LNB W7BU

Inter-State: adjacent Oregon RHSCD II [ARES District 1] and Oregon RHSCD IV [ARES District 2]

n/a LSB J3E

n/a LSB J3E

n/a LSB J3E 100.0 FM-W F3E 100.0 FM-W F3E

147.320 none 442.325 none

147.120 none 147.140 none 146.960 none 442.075 none 145.450 none

147.920 447.325

S. Saddle Mtn. S. Saddle Mtn.

3.985 7.245 3.985

n/a LSB J3E n/a LSB J3E n/a LSB J3E n/a USB J3E n/a LSB J3E

147.720
100.0 FM-W F3E
Mt. Hood 147.740
107.2 FM-W F3E
Pdx West Hills 146.360
127.3 FM-W F3E
Goat Mtn. 447.075
103.5 FM-W F3E
Oregon City, OR 144.850
118.8 FM-W F3E
Megler Mtn.

page21image1026468208

Amatuer Radio Emergency Communications Interoperability Plan

ICS Form 217A

e ni

Receive
Transmit
Emission Frequency
Tone / NAC
Frequency
Tone / NAC Mode ITU

Channel Configuration

  1. 74  repeater

  2. 75  repeater

  3. 76  simplex

  4. 77  repeater

  5. 78  repeater

  1. 78  repeater

  2. 79  simplex

  3. 80  repeater

  4. 81  repeater

  5. 82  repeater

  6. 83  repeater

  7. 84  repeater

  8. 85  repeater

  9. 86  repeater

  10. 87  repeater

  11. 88  repeater

Channel Name

CLAT02 CLAT03

COL01 COL02 COL08 COL12 HOOD01 HOOD02 HOOD03 MC01 MC02 MC03 WC01 WC02 WC03

Eligible Users

Clatsop Co. Clatsop Co. Columbia Co. Columbia Co. Columbia Co. Columbia Co. Columbia Co. Hood River Co. Hood River Co. Hood River Co. Multnomah Co. Multnomah Co. Multnomah Co. Washington Co. Washington Co. Washington Co.

Remarks

L

COMMUNICATIONS RESOURCE AVAILABILITY WORKSHEET

Frequency Band

Amateur Radio
(US CFR, Title 47, Part 97)

Description

Regional & State Interoperability

Inter-State: Oregon Office of Emergency Management [W7OEM]

  1. 89  simplex 1.978

  2. 90  simplex 3.964

  3. 91  simplex 5.3465

  4. 92  simplex 7.248

  5. 93  repeater OEM01 145.330

n/a n/a n/a n/a none

1.978

3.964 5.3465 7.248 144.730

n/a LSB J3E n/a LSB J3E n/a USB J3E n/a LSB J3E

186.2 FM-W F3E
Prospect Hills

Washington RHSCD IV Appendix C, page 4 of 4

Updated: 22 March 2016

146.760
none 145.490
none 3.773
n/a 146.880
none 444.625
none 145.270
none 144.920
none 145.150
none 444.900
none 147.100
none 146.840
none 147.280
none 146.940
none 146.900
none 147.360
none 440.350
none

146.160
118.8 FM-W F3E
Nicolai Mtn.
144.890
118.8 FM-W F3E
Seaside, OR
3.773
n/a LSB J3E
Adv/Extra Class freq. 146.280
114.8 FM-W F3E
Meissner L.O. 449.625
107.2 FM-W F3E
St. Helens, OR 144.670
107.2 FM-W F3E
Timber, OR
144.920
none FM-W F3E
RMS, 1200 baud 144.550
94.8 FM-W F3E
Mt. Defiance 449.900
100.0 FM-W F3E
Middle Mtn.
147.700
100.0 FM-W F3E
Mt. Defiance 146.240
none FM-W F3E
Larch Mtn.
147.880
167.9 FM-W F3E
Mt. Scott
146.340
none FM-W F3E
Mt. Scott
146.300
127.3 FM-W F3E
Chehalem Mtn. 147.960
107.2 FM-W F3E
Cooper Mtn. 445.350
127.3 FM-W F3E
Pdx West Hills

W7BU WA7VE

N7EI N7EI KJ7IY N7EI WA7ROB KA7HRC KF7LN W7LT WB7QIW W7LT K7WWG WC7EOC KB7OYI

W7SRA

Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Interoperability Plan

Appendix D – Acronym Definitions

These definitions are intended to improve communications clarity between amateur radio emergency communications

personnel, Emergency ARES

ARRL COP

DEC

DHS EC

EM EOC

Managers, public service agencies, and the general public.

Amateur Radio Emergency Service – initiated in 1935, a standby radio service consisting of licensed amateur radio operators who have voluntarily registered their qualifications and equipment with their local ARES leadership for communications duty in the public service when disaster strikes.

American Radio Relay League – founded in 1914, it is the largest organization of radio amateurs in the United States, with more than 167,200 members (as of August 2015).

Common Operating Picture. A Department of Defense term describing an identical display of relevant information. It is used in civilian emergency management to enable on­scene and off­ scene personnel to have the same information, including availability and location of resources and status of assistance requests.

District Emergency Coordinator – is an appointee of the ARES who leads emergency communications preparedness efforts in one of the nine ARES districts in Washington state (which have the same boundaries as the Washington RHSCDs). This person also has a dual state­level appointment as a Regional RACES Coordinator for their RHSCD.

United States Department of Homeland Security – formed in 2002, its mission is to ensure that the United States is safe, secure, and resilient against terrorism and other hazards.

Emergency Coordinator – is an appointee of the ARES who leads emergency communicationspreparednessandresponseswithinalocallocaljurisdiction. Thisperson may also have a dual local­level appointment by local emergency management authorities the local RACES Radio Officer.

Emergency Manager – the governmental official in each jurisdiction who is responsible for emergency mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery within that jurisdiction.

Emergency Operations Center – the central command and control facility (and/or backup facility) in each jurisdiction which is responsible for emergency management and for communications with the Washington Emergency Management Division.

EOC Relay Station An EOC may designate one or more amateur radio stations to serve as relay points for radio traffic to and from that EOC. An EOC Relay Station would be activated if amateur radio communications at an EOC were impaired in some way (volunteer staff overload, signal interference, equipment/antenna failure, etc.). Although the selection criteria is up to the individual county, it would likely be someone with EOC operations training, experience in HF/VHF/UHF net operations, and located close enough to the EOC so that message relay can take place on VHF/UHF simplex frequencies.

ESF Emergency Support Function – A portion of a comprehensive emergency management plan (federal, state, or local) that describes activities related to a single function. Communications is ESF #2.

Washington RHSCD IV Appendix D, page 1 of 3 updated: 15 August 2015

Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Interoperability Plan

FCC Federal Communications Commission – created in 1934, an independent agency of the United States government which regulates interstate and international communications by radio, television, wire, satellite and cable.

FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency – created in 1979 and part of the DHS since 2003, FEMA coordinates responses to disasters in the United States and that overwhelm the resources of local and state authorities.

HSPD Homeland Security Presidential Directive – An executive order issued by the President of the United States with the advice and consent of the National Security Council. HSPD5 directed the Secretary of Homeland Security to develop and administer a National Incident Management System (NIMS).

ISNAP Incident Snapshot. A standard report form used by the Washington State Emergency Operations Center which is submitted by participating counties and tribes upon EOC activation for a major event that could be considered catastrophic. If a county fails to report, the assumption will be that they are unable to report.

MARS Military Auxiliary Radio System – created in 1948 and sponsored by the United States Department of Defense, a civilian auxiliary to the Air Force, Army, and Navy consisting primarily of licensed amateur radio operators who assist the military with communications on a local, national, and international basis as an adjunct to normal communications.

Mesh A wireless data network topology used by the amateur radio community where each node is capable of discovering other network nodes and self­configuring an ad hoc network under emergency conditions.

NCS / Alternate NCS Net Control Station – the amateur radio station (equipment and operator) presiding over an emergency communications net session. Each station authorized to be a NCS is deemed an Alternate NCS when not actively controlling the net.

NIMS National Incident Management System – the federally mandated emergency management doctrine used across the United States to coordinate emergency preparedness and incident management and response among the public (federal, tribal, state, and local government agencies) non­governmental organization, and private sectors.

NTS National Traffic System – established in 1947 in Washington state and in 1949 nationally, an organized network of amateur radio operators which relays written messages throughout the U.S. and Canada from origin to destination during emergencies. Radiograms are used to communicate information critical to saving lives or property, or to inquire about the health or welfare of a disaster victim.

RACES Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service – developed in 1952, a standby radio service governed under Part 97.407 of the FCC rules and regulations. RACES is activated by local, county, and state jurisdictions, uses FEMA protocols, and are the only amateur radio operators authorized to transmit during declared emergencies when the President of the United States specifically invokes powers granted under 47 U.S.C. §606.

page23image1025909312

Washington RHSCD IV Appendix D, page 2 of 3 updated: 15 August 2015

Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Interoperability Plan

RHSCD Regional Homeland Security Coordination District – an area of the state which administers federal grant funds and promotes coordination, collaboration, and improved communications over a broad range of areas that include planning, training, exercises, resource sharing, and mutual aid.

RO Radio Officer – the liaison between the RACES organization and the emergency management director. This person may also have a dual local­level appointment by local emergency management authorities the Emergency Coordinator.

SEC Section Emergency Coordinator – is an appointee of the ARES who leads emergency communications preparedness efforts in one of the two ARRL sections in Washington state. This person also has a dual state­level appointment as an Assistant State RACES Radio Officer.

SITREP Situation Report. A Department of Defense term used in civilian emergency management. Situation reports offer a snapshot of the past operational period of an incident and contain confirmed or verified information regarding the explicit details relating to an incident.

UASI Urban Areas Security Initiative – part of the Homeland Security Grant Program in the 2010 federal fiscal year. Clark County is part of the Portland UASI.

Winlink A worldwide system of radio stations and network assets supporting email by radio, with non­ commercial links to Internet email. The system provides service to emergency communicators without access to the Internet.

Washington RHSCD IV Appendix D, page 3 of 3 updated: 15 August 2015

Washington State Emergency Management Division
Logistics Section
Communications Annex
(This document supersedes all preceding State RACES Plans)
UNIT MISSION AND GOALS
The mission of the Logistics Communications Unit (LCU) is to provide uninterrupted
communication channels between AHJs, critical infrastructure and response partners
supporting disaster-related operations with Washington State Emergency Management.
The LCU coordinates and operates key elements of the statewide alternate, contingency and
emergency communications infrastructure.
The LCU operates a network of twelve DHS CISA SHARES Radio Messaging Service (RMS)
stations 24 hours a day using Winlink®, a radio-based email service established for
emergency communications purposes. These stations are available to tribal, county and
large city emergency management agencies, certain NGOs and designated critical
infrastructure partners licensed with DHS CISA SHARES. WA EMD’s SHARES RMS stations
serve all of Washington State as well as our partners across FEMA Region X, the western
United States, Alaska and Hawaii.
The goals of the LCU are to provide:
• Tactical voice communications, for coordination of personnel and resource
movement(s) as needed.
• Voice message traffic when passing message traffic via digital means is not available.
• Data communications through Winlink® in the form of email and document
attachments. Examples include but are not limited to: situation reports (SITREPs),
staffing schedules, requests for resources (ICS-213RR), general message traffic (ICS-231
General Message), ICS forms/ documents and ISNAP reports. Templates of these forms
can be found in the Winlink program.
• Redundant communications, giving WA EMD and AHJs both alternate and additional
forms of communication when systems are overtaxed or impaired.
COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM REDUNDANCY PLAN
In the immediate aftermath of a disaster, communications usage through primary providers
(phone and Internet) spikes. The sheer volume of traffic alone can degrade emergency
communications capabilities. Primary communications infrastructure may suffer damage in
some disaster scenarios. WA EMD Logistics established the PACE Communications Plan
(described below). The PACE plan provides (1) both alternate and additional communications
resources, minimizing the impact and potential bottlenecks due to primary providers exceeding
their maximum capacity, (2) communications not subject to single-point-of-failure challenges,
and (3) communications services to areas that have experienced outages due to damage or
other systemic failure that do not rely on primary communications infrastructure. The PACE
plan outlines both how and what resources are available.
PACE is the acronym for Primary, Alternate, Contingency and Emergency Communications
Channels:
• Primary Communications Channels. This includes commercial telephone services
(tactical) and Internet providers (data). In many if not most disaster events, primary
communications channels are more than sufficient to handle need. Please click here to
download primary phone, Internet information and email addresses.
• Alternate Communications Channels. Implemented when primary voice and/or email
is impacted/ interrupted, temporarily unavailable or overloaded and resources are
needed.
▪ Tactical (voice): Satellite phone; CEMNET.
▪ Data: Winlink email. Email address via Internet: [email protected]. Email
address by Winlink radio: NNA0WA. Additional email addresses as per
standing/ operational period ICS-205.
• Contingency Communications Channels. Implemented when primary and alternate
communications channels are impacted or insufficient to handle the message load
needed for mitigation and recovery.
▪ Tactical: As per standing/ operational period ICS 205.
▪ Data: Winlink email. Email address via Internet: [email protected]. Email
address by Winlink radio: NNA0WA. Additional email addresses as per
standing/ operational period ICS 205.
• Emergency Communications Channels. Implemented when a disaster event has
occurred and the scope may not be fully known. Emergency communications provides
resources specific to the disaster response.
▪ Tactical: As peer standing/ operational period ICS 205.
▪ Data: Winlink email. Email address via Internet: [email protected]. Email
address by Winlink radio: NNA0WA. Additional Winlink email addresses can be
found on pre-event standing/ operational period ICS 205.
LOGISTICS COMMUNICATIONS UNIT ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE
Insert Org Chart Here
The Logistics Communications Unit is organized under the Logistics Service Branch and is managed by
the WA EMD Logistics Chief. The LCU has communications assets and teams on-site at Camp Murray
and at locations across Washington State.
The LCU is coordinated by the Logistics Service Branch. The LCU consists of four teams:
– SEOC Radio Room Operations
– WA EMD/ DHS CISA SHARES RMS Station Operations
– HF Radio Net Operations on SHARES and 60 Meter Operations (Voice message traffic)
– WA EMD 220 MHz Amateur Radio Network Operations (Voice message traffic)
Specific information regarding transmit/ receive frequencies, function, and operational modes can be
found on the preset standing/ operational ICS-205. For the current preset standing ICS-205, contact
[email protected]
COMMUNICATIONS UNIT CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS AND ACTIVATION PROCEDURE
Mobilization, staffing and demobilization of the LCU follows ICS procedures established as per
any given operational period of an incident.
In the event the Logistics Communications Unit is activated, the Logistics Chief or his/her
designee will be responsible to staff positions. In the event of a disaster incident, the standing
ICS-205 will be in force throughout the first operational period of the event, or until the new
ICS-201/ ICS-205 is released and is in full effect.
RADIO FREQUENCIES, OPERATIONAL PRACTICES
Both digital and tactical operational frequencies/ assignments can be found on the ICS-205.
Operational practices will follow plain language procedures as per National Incident Command
System/ Incident Command System (NICS/ ICS). Guidelines. Voice operations etiquette follow
the National Coast Guard Radio Operations Guide.
TRAINING OF COMMUNICATIONS TEAMS AND UNIT MEMBERS
The LCU helps coordinate training tools and guidelines for individual communications specialists
(RADOs or “Radio Operators) and AHJ radio units in all aspects established PACE plan.
Training and training materials follow NIMS/ ICS procedures and protocols, using Homeland
Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) guidelines. These support protocols and
procedures used in responses throughout Washington State, FEMA Region X, the western
United States, Alaska and Hawaii and will allow for the development of exercises and
interoperability support with our partners across FEMA Region X and neighboring states.
Exercises and trainings focus on on-air protocols and procedures for the unit member and
practical disaster radio unit exercises in which communications systems have suffered damage
and radio units must practice reestablishing communications through alternate means.
Individual unit members can be certified as WA State RADOs through the completion of Position
Task Books (PTBs). Communications unit training will follow Homeland Security Exercise and
Evaluation Program (HSEEP) guidelines by certified trainers. Training will be provided for both
professional emergency management staff and volunteer staff specific to the roles each would
fill. Information regarding trainings and PTBs can be found in training guidelines and the
training schedule.
WA EMD has developed unit member training guidelines for the training of both professional
and volunteer staff. The training guidelines are based upon Federal Emergency Management
Agency (FEMA) NIMS/ICS standards that are incremental in nature. This creates an environment
in which personnel are guided incrementally through a process that leads to increasing levels of
proficiency and greater unit capability. The intent of these trainings and certifications is
standardize communications protocols and procedures as they pertain to responding large
regional and catastrophic disaster events, but they will also serve as the standard for any
communications practices that require contact with agencies outside of the local AHJ. As these
practices and protocols are standardized around the National Incident Command Structure
(NICS), it will also allow radio units around Washington State to support our regional partners
across FEMA Region X, the western United States, Alaska and Hawaii with communications
assistance should the need arise.
These guidelines are designed to address interagency operational practices and do not replace
local trainings that support specific local needs and that are unique and specific to that agency.
Local operations and training decisions regarding local operations remains entirely within the
purview of the local AHJ.

Organizations

https//www.co.cowlitz.wa.us/196/Emergency-Management

www.co.cowlitz.wa.us/267/Sheriff

www.co.cowlitz.wa.us

www.ccareswa.org

www.wastateares.org

www.wastateares.org/washington-state-emergency-net

trying.fema.gov/emi.aspx

www.iaem.org/students/pd/independent-study

CommunicationAcademy.com

Information

Scroll to Top